SoCal Jet Boats

Tech Talk => Engine Mechanical / Electrical => Topic started by: trido on November 24, 2015, 08:24:30 PM

Title: "Winterizing"
Post by: trido on November 24, 2015, 08:24:30 PM
Just a quick question, how many of you "winterize" your boats and what's the process entail? This will be my first winter as a boat owner and I would like to know the process. Is it really needed if the boat is stored in Southern California? Instead of winterizing can I just take it out once a month to Elsinore and give it a couple laps around the toilet?


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Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: wrxracer87 on November 24, 2015, 09:14:58 PM
In my opinion if you're storing it out side, I would at least drain your block.  Wouldn't want to end up with a cracked block . and I also add fuel stabilizer to my tanks. 
Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: GT Jets on November 24, 2015, 10:47:55 PM
Fill the fuel tanks,  add some StaBil and install a battery tender. Drain the block every time you use it.
Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: trido on November 25, 2015, 12:02:46 AM

Fill the fuel tanks,  add some StaBil and install a battery tender. Drain the block every time you use it.

Thanks for the advice guys, when you say drain the block, are you referring to oil or coolant? I have an open cooling system. If you are referring to what little water might be left in the water jackets, how does one do that? Is there a drain plug somewhere on the block?


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Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: eastcoastboys on November 25, 2015, 05:57:13 AM
Yah both sides of the block should have small valves if it's a marine motor set up. And I would undo the line coming from the pump too. Does it even get below 50 out there any way


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Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: GT Jets on November 25, 2015, 06:31:36 AM
Yah both sides of the block should have small valves if it's a marine motor set up. And I would undo the line coming from the pump too. Does it even get below 50 out there any way


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Is rare for temperatures to get near freezing, but it does happen.

The oil stays in the engine.

The reason to drain it is to slow corrosion. That water will just sit there untreated and exposed to air. Not like a car with anti freeze and under pressure with no air.

GT

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Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: Your Mom on November 25, 2015, 05:09:57 PM
Putting anti freeze/distilled water in mine. Wash out the block at least once a season. I only got a coffee cup full of sand from the entire block this season... The anti will keep corrosion down as well. I fill mine up into intake.
Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: GT Jets on November 25, 2015, 05:26:44 PM
Putting anti freeze/distilled water in mine. Wash out the block at least once a season. I only got a coffee cup full of sand from the entire block this season... The anti will keep corrosion down as well. I fill mine up into intake.

Just running some plain old soapy water through the engine before draining it will do the same thing.
Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: Your Mom on November 25, 2015, 06:18:25 PM
I use plain water to rinse but leave anti/distilled filled up into mani...
Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: trido on November 25, 2015, 06:32:43 PM
My boat is stored outside in Corona, so it doesn't get too cold.

Regarding the battery tender, anybody have any luck with the solar type?

I guess I could just take my batteries out for the winter, but I live in a condo with no garage and my only choice would be to keep them in my living room and my girl is trying to prevent that lol


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Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: Your Mom on November 25, 2015, 06:54:55 PM
Just keep em off the cement... on a board or something like that. If your batts are exposed to thieves, they will be gone. Just make sure its a float type charger.
Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: jbrundahl3@yahoo.com on November 25, 2015, 08:16:03 PM
Why can't the battery be on the cement? 


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Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: GT Jets on November 25, 2015, 08:59:15 PM
Why can't the battery be on the cement? 


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When they leach, the acid screws up the cement.

GT
Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: jbrundahl3@yahoo.com on November 26, 2015, 07:22:58 AM
Oh ok I thought it would somehow damage the battery. Thank you sir for your expertise. 👍🏻


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Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: boots on November 26, 2015, 07:11:06 PM
I live in Minnesota we all know it gets cold here. You want to fill the fuel tanks add stabilizer, drain the block and water pump and any water hoses. Put batteries on battery tender or in basement. Make sure there's no water in the hall that will freeze and expand of the boat. And definitely put a nice thick cover over the boat and stay warm brother.
Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: trido on November 29, 2015, 02:36:16 PM
Thanks for all the responses guys! I'm learning a lot off this forum


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Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: el mojado on November 30, 2015, 12:36:16 AM
Explain why FILL gas tanks, please. Thanks. Thought empty was a good choice.
Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: GT Jets on November 30, 2015, 06:51:38 AM
Explain why FILL gas tanks, please. Thanks. Thought empty was a good choice.

The fuel you buy at the pump these days likely has alcohol/methanol in it.

With the extra space in the tank, condensation forms very readily. You will have a water and corrosion issue.

With bare aluminum exposed to air, corrosion is likely to form.

Obviously if the boat won't be running for several months, empty is better,  but a month or two,  full is preferred.

GT
Title: Re: "Winterizing"
Post by: boots on November 30, 2015, 08:01:43 AM
True and when it gets warm and cold warm and cold out. You get the condensation in the tank if the tanks are full will be less water in the tank in the long run.