Jet boats & salt water

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tator321

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« on: March 29, 2010, 12:27:13 PM »
I have a 15' jet boat project Im working on, I live close to the intercoastal waterway in FL. What do i need to know if I want to run in salt water, or is it not uncommon to run in salt water. BTW SBC. with a jacuzzi jet.



GlassCutter

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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2010, 01:50:59 PM »
OK seeing as how 20 people read this and didn''t respond yer gonna have to get my take.  It can be done but your boat will never be the same.  Seeing as how you live close to the beach anyway maybe the boat is kinda rough around the edges anyway.  The big thing is you have to WASH AND RINSE OFF EVERYTHING !!!  As in every nook and cranny or a serious case of the uglies will set in.  Even rinse out the inside of the motor and pump when you get done but make sure you have water running to the pump correctly when you do it.  Honestly the trailer though will never be the same.

In all honesty most people on this site would probably tell you not to do it if you want to keep your boat as nice as the day you bought it.  If it is already kind of crusty, I say why the hell not?  In the words of Teddy Roosevelt "do what you can, with what you have, where you are."

And welcome to the madness we call jet boats !   ;D
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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2010, 02:16:57 PM »
ya what he said...

there is a solution u can buy to help flush out the salt out of the engine and such....my friend uses it every time he pulls his boat out of the water....it came with a little cup and goes in line with the hose....you should have a flush out connector on the water intake line  run it through there for about 10 to 15 mins or untill solution is gone...and hose off everything!!! and you should be fine...my parents live in edgewater fl. close by daytona...he does the same thing with his outboard and cruises the intercoastal all the time never has a problem...
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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2010, 04:25:50 PM »
Do a heat exchange for the motor and all you HAVE to rinse is the pump.
Bye bye, thank you very much.
GT can probably set you up with one or tell you how to do it.

-beerjet-
i dont but im all for stuffin shit in her ass to make her go away :-*

Legal Chemistry

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« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2010, 03:53:14 PM »
Install heat exchange to keep salt out of the motor.

Use SALT AWAY after each outing.

Before you launch, WD40 fogged all over the trailer and any metal (including engine, wheels, hull fittings, exhaust, etc) will to wonders to help keep it protected from salt water.

rinse, rinse, rinse.

Have fun!

jrork

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« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2010, 07:31:22 PM »
Finally, Something I know something about!!!!   Okay, I'll jump in on this deal.

We have ran our boat in the salt every year for that last 8 years or so.  In fact, it's been in freshwater only a handful of times compared to almost exclusively in salt.  The nearest lake that we can try to run is an 1 1/2 hours away whereas the salt is less than a minute.

Up until last year all we ever used was soap and water.  The trailer, chrome wheels are all the original ones we brought home with the boat.  This last year we have used SaltAway and it seems to work really well as well (though much more expensive than soap)

The only areas that I have ever had a problem with relates to the Bassett headers and the starter. We would often get water splashed up on the motor.  The salt water would instantly evaporate away on the headers but leave little salt rings on the chrome.  No amount of polish would remove it.  Those same headers are now on the Sanger with no rust issues.  The starter would get doused with water from everyone swinging and with time would cause problems. At the time these were just cheapo Schucks starters.  I've since switched to Powermaster stuff and no problems period.

If the salt is close, don't hesitate boating there but just plan on cleaning the boat up when you get home.  I've always been anal about not doing anything till theboat is clean and put away.  Have fun



Heres the Sanger in the salt as well. 

« Last Edit: March 30, 2010, 07:33:30 PM by jrork »

GT Jets

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« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2010, 11:03:15 PM »
Florida salt is a bit more brutal than the Pacific, the alkalinity is high as well as the salinity...

A trick I have used when on the Rogue is to take some Dawn dishwashing soap and water in a spray bottle at about 10:1 and spray it on all the shiny parts and let it dry, it forms a good barrier that can be washed off easily (this is actually how they keep copper plumbing fittings pretty while at the hardware store)...


Salt is most hard on any area of the engine that is exposed to air as far as in the cooling jackets, this is the number one reason for the addition of a heat exchanger...If you don't want to go closed cooling, I would recommend running it as cool as you can get away with (salt starts to crystallize at above 150*F) and flush often....Aluminum takes the hit first....

Good luck!

GT
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If i get some free time tonight at work, ill play with it and post it for everyone to see.

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« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2010, 12:36:08 AM »
The Drag boats run at least three times a year in Chandler here at Firebird Lake in it's salt water. Dunno what they do to clean 'em out or what not, but, apparently, they're much faster in it!

Ray
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75 fantasy

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« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2010, 02:11:38 PM »
I have a 15' jet boat project Im working on, I live close to the intercoastal waterway in FL. What do i need to know if I want to run in salt water, or is it not uncommon to run in salt water. BTW SBC. with a jacuzzi jet.

would he need a sea strainer? just asking.
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GT Jets

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« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2010, 07:59:05 PM »
would he need a sea strainer? just asking.

Sea Strainers are for catching chunks of debris, sorta depends on how dirty the water is, I would recommend a #20 screen on anything that puts water through header cooling orifices...

GT
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If i get some free time tonight at work, ill play with it and post it for everyone to see.

Time to man up and yank it John!  :banghead:
Ray

tator321

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« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2010, 05:43:56 AM »
Install heat exchange to keep salt out of the motor.

Use SALT AWAY after each outing.

Before you launch, WD40 fogged all over the trailer and any metal (including engine, wheels, hull fittings, exhaust, etc) will to wonders to help keep it protected from salt water.

rinse, rinse, rinse.

Have fun!



Where can I found some info on the heat exchangers, like pics and or diagrahm on how the system works.

tator321

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« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2010, 05:51:02 AM »
Finally, Something I know something about!!!!   Okay, I'll jump in on this deal.

We have ran our boat in the salt every year for that last 8 years or so.  In fact, it's been in freshwater only a handful of times compared to almost exclusively in salt.  The nearest lake that we can try to run is an 1 1/2 hours away whereas the salt is less than a minute.

Up until last year all we ever used was soap and water.  The trailer, chrome wheels are all the original ones we brought home with the boat.  This last year we have used SaltAway and it seems to work really well as well (though much more expensive than soap)

The only areas that I have ever had a problem with relates to the Bassett headers and the starter. We would often get water splashed up on the motor.  The salt water would instantly evaporate away on the headers but leave little salt rings on the chrome.  No amount of polish would remove it.  Those same headers are now on the Sanger with no rust issues.  The starter would get doused with water from everyone swinging and with time would cause problems. At the time these were just cheapo Schucks starters.  I've since switched to Powermaster stuff and no problems period.

If the salt is close, don't hesitate boating there but just plan on cleaning the boat up when you get home.  I've always been anal about not doing anything till theboat is clean and put away.  Have fun



Heres the Sanger in the salt as well. 


I have had other boats and ran in salt water but this is my first jet boat. I guess one of my big concerns will be the headers. I plan on going wit Basset OT water injected headers and realize salt is not ideal and if there is anything diffrent I should do to save the headers other then a thorough cleaning and maybe some WD-40

tator321

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« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2010, 11:55:09 AM »
Florida salt is a bit more brutal than the Pacific, the alkalinity is high as well as the salinity...

A trick I have used when on the Rogue is to take some Dawn dishwashing soap and water in a spray bottle at about 10:1 and spray it on all the shiny parts and let it dry, it forms a good barrier that can be washed off easily (this is actually how they keep copper plumbing fittings pretty while at the hardware store)...


Salt is most hard on any area of the engine that is exposed to air as far as in the cooling jackets, this is the number one reason for the addition of a heat exchanger...If you don't want to go closed cooling, I would recommend running it as cool as you can get away with (salt starts to crystallize at above 150*F) and flush often....Aluminum takes the hit first....

Good luck!

GT
GT can you tell me some about the heat exchanger, what it is, how it installs,works...etc. Thanks in advance.

Legal Chemistry

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« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2010, 02:04:36 PM »
with a heat exchange - you're running closed cooling.  You recirculate water in your block and use an external exchange (the big tube) plumbed with raw water.  This is great for jets which often have trouble reaching operating temp or have pressure issues.  Slap a t-stat and you can run all day at 180 (or whatever you choose). 

Here's a pic as an example:


GT Jets

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« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2010, 08:49:10 PM »
Yeah, what LC said.

One thing on the closed cooling dealio, you need an OEM type water pump on the engine to circulate......Work badass..................

GT
  • Boat #1: 1992 Carrera 20.5 Elite (I/O bitches)
  • Boat #2: 19' Bubble deck Jet BBC Berkeley
If i get some free time tonight at work, ill play with it and post it for everyone to see.

Time to man up and yank it John!  :banghead:
Ray

 


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