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sandeggo

  • Karma: +7/-0
Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« on: January 30, 2012, 01:13:03 pm »
3/8"  angle
1/4" plate
Bevel the 3/8" to aid in penetration and so there's weld still in the joint when sanded smooth
Weld it up


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ka0tyk

  • Karma: +30/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2012, 01:26:01 pm »
lookin good! 
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HaulsBalls

  • Karma: +1/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2012, 01:32:53 pm »
Keep the pics coming, are you putting this on a new project? 
  • Boat #1: '75 Hallett Bubbledeck w/460 Ford
  • Boat #2: '73 Hallett 21' Cruiser
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sandeggo

  • Karma: +7/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2012, 01:41:54 pm »
These are 19ftdana's I just welded them
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19ftCheyenne

  • Karma: +24/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2012, 05:57:40 pm »
Thanks again for welding those up. They came out perfect.. I think i had about $11 dollars in material into that..  :) I sure do owe u a buncha  :beer: :beer: :beer:
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sandeggo

  • Karma: +7/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2012, 06:04:00 pm »
Eh no problem, glad to help, get pics of the setup
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SuperJet

  • Karma: +2/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2012, 06:24:48 pm »
SD what tungsten do you prefer to use when you are welding up aluminum like this? I usually use pure but I ran out recently and used some 2% Thoriated and it seemed to work a little better. Am I using the right one? BTW those block are pretty bitchen
  • Boat #1: 1978 Sanger SuperJet
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Mine was stiff when working it back and forth on the trailer.
Once I got it on the water and under power, it was amazing!

sandeggo

  • Karma: +7/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2012, 08:04:21 pm »
I use 2% thoriated on everything. You shouldn't use pure on an advanced square wave machine like a miller dynasty. For these blocks I was on a synchro wave 300. Sharp pointed 1/8" tungsten, #8 cup, 200 amps, balance was set to about 8 on the balance/dig control I think. The pointed electrode allows less arc wander than a balled tungsten and is less prone to tungsten spitting. You want to adjust the balance to where you have just enough cleaning to get the job done. I coulda turned the cleaning down on these a little but I didn't clean them before I welded them. Turning it more towards dig will cause the AC cycle to spend more time at the negative portion of the cycle and will shrink the white cleaning action closer to the bead. The cleaning action should be fairly close to the toelines of the weld. I'd say anywhere from 1/8"-1/4" or so.

A little note about AC aluminum welding. Aluminum has an oxide layer on it that is almost as hard as diamond and has a higher melting point than the metal below it. That's why we use AC.
AC is essentially dc - then dc+ repeated over and over.
Dc - focuses the heat towards the base metal. (penetrates)
Dc+ focuses the heat towards the tungsten. (cleans)
Balance control changes the time spent at each cycle.
Too much cleaning results in lack of penetration and a melted tungsten.
Too much penetration (dig) results in a sink hole type puddle that is not clearly defined.
The trick is the puddle will turn a shiny chrome color (think terminator 2 bad guy)
When the puddle turns that color only then add filler. If you try before that then the filler will melt and not join to anything ( think solder dropping on the ground)

That's all I'm typing for now as I'm laying in bed and have been up since 3:45 am. I'll add more tomorrow. 
One last thing, you should see me weld with two good hands.
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SuperJet

  • Karma: +2/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2012, 08:46:19 pm »
I use 2% thoriated on everything. You shouldn't use pure on an advanced square wave machine like a miller dynasty. For these blocks I was on a synchro wave 300. Sharp pointed 1/8" tungsten, #8 cup, 200 amps, balance was set to about 8 on the balance/dig control I think. The pointed electrode allows less arc wander than a balled tungsten and is less prone to tungsten spitting. You want to adjust the balance to where you have just enough cleaning to get the job done. I coulda turned the cleaning down on these a little but I didn't clean them before I welded them. Turning it more towards dig will cause the AC cycle to spend more time at the negative portion of the cycle and will shrink the white cleaning action closer to the bead. The cleaning action should be fairly close to the toelines of the weld. I'd say anywhere from 1/8"-1/4" or so.

A little note about AC aluminum welding. Aluminum has an oxide layer on it that is almost as hard as diamond and has a higher melting point than the metal below it. That's why we use AC.
AC is essentially dc - then dc+ repeated over and over.
Dc - focuses the heat towards the base metal. (penetrates)
Dc+ focuses the heat towards the tungsten. (cleans)
Balance control changes the time spent at each cycle.
Too much cleaning results in lack of penetration and a melted tungsten.
Too much penetration (dig) results in a sink hole type puddle that is not clearly defined.
The trick is the puddle will turn a shiny chrome color (think terminator 2 bad guy)
When the puddle turns that color only then add filler. If you try before that then the filler will melt and not join to anything ( think solder dropping on the ground)

That's all I'm typing for now as I'm laying in bed and have been up since 3:45 am. I'll add more tomorrow. 
One last thing, you should see me weld with two good hands.

Very cool thank you for the explanation. I have some TIG but nothing formal as far as instruction. I am working with a Miller Dialarc HF. thing is a dinosaur, but its what I have to work with right now.  Ill eventually start a new thred with some of my practice pieces.
  • Boat #1: 1978 Sanger SuperJet
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Mine was stiff when working it back and forth on the trailer.
Once I got it on the water and under power, it was amazing!

jim brock

  • Karma: +17/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2012, 08:41:16 am »
your angle blocks need to have the same angle put on them that your pump intake has on it as your motor will have the same angle, unless you angle the stringer rails.
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sandeggo

  • Karma: +7/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2012, 09:27:28 am »
all the ones I have seen sold by manufaturers are just ground into the material. Sam was told about this and he will be taking care of it.
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BIG JOHNSON

  • Karma: +1/-0
Re: Fabricating rail kit angled blocks
« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2012, 09:36:58 am »
Artwork.

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  • Boat #1: 1994 Ultra LX 21"
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